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Improved Montana

 
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Runarsson

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Location: Soderhamn, Sweden

PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 8:00 pm    Post subject: Improved Montana Reply with quote

Here's one from snowy cold Sweden: 'Improved Montana'. Not totally unlike the original one, but more up-to-date with some "glitter and glamour" material. It has given me some nice browns and rainbows around here.

IMPROVED MONTANA


Material (in tie-in order):
Hook: Natural Bend or Streamer, #10
Thread: Gudebrod 8/0, black
Tail: Fox tail, Black
Abdomen: Antron yarn, black
Wingcase: Antron yarn, black
Hackle: Hen, black
Thorax: Any coarse "flashy" synthetic dubbing, color optional



Step 1:


Put a hook in the vise. This is a Dai-Riki 270 Natural Bend hook, a hook type that's often used for stonefly nymphs. A regular streamer hook can also be used.



Step 2:


Tie in the thread and cover the shank to the hook bend. On a hook like this (without an actual "start" of the bend), use the barb as a guide.



Step 3:


Cut a bunch of hair from fox tail and clean out the longer guard hairs. Put them aside... or in the waste bag. They are of no interest now. What we're interested in are the softer hairs. Tie in a tail, but don't trim the waste just yet.

TIP: These fox tail hairs are also a very good substitute for Marabou on bugger flies. They are soft enough to make the the fly alive in the water but they still don't tangle up in the hook bend. (They are also much more durable.)



Step 4:


Tie down the surplus to about 2/3 of the fly's total body length.



Step 5:


Cut the waste end and return with the thread to the back of the hook. Tight and touching wraps now, to create an even and compact underbody.



Step 6:


First synthetic material... antron yarn. Looks a little bit like poly yarn, but the difference is that the filaments are triangular. This causes it to reflect light much better. We like sparkly...



Step 7:


Tie in the antron yarn and see to it that the waste end is long enough to cover at least 2/3 of the fly's total body length.



Step 8:


Tie down the waste end to 2/3 of the body length with tight and touching wraps, again to ensure a compact and even underbody. Cut the waste and let the bobbin rest for a while.



Step 9:


Stretch the antron yarn and twist it quite hard. It's supposed to be like a round rope and compact enough to keep that shape while it's wrapped onto the hook.



Step 10:


Wrap the antron rope forward to the thorax starting point. Make a loose thread wrap around it and then tighten the thread at the same time as you let the antron rope "relax" and collapse under the thread. This will give a neater tie-off. Secure with another few wraps and cut the waste.



Step 11:


Cut another two pieces of Antron yarn for the wingcase. Flatten them out and untangle the filaments with the bodkin.



Step 12:


Tie in the antron pieces together and try to keep the antron filaments evenly spread out on the top of the hook. Form a little cone with the thread that is pressing the filaments firmly against the hard abdomen and keeps them in a spread-out formation.



Step 13:


Tie in a hackle feather with the dull side up. Rooster or hen is optional. I prefer hen though, since it adds a little "life" to the fly.



Step 14:


For the thorax, we take a step further from tradition and use dubbing instead of yarn. There are many variants of synthetic dubbing and as long as they are sparkly (and preferably quite coarse), they will suit this fly. My own favourites are Ice Dub and Crystal Seal.



Step 15:


Be firm when dubbing the thread. The thorax is supposed to be quite fat and at the same time compact. Don't take too much dubbing at a time. Coarse synthetic dubbing isn't as co-operative as natural dubbing. It's better to dub in steps and wrap multiple layers.



Step 16:


A finished and compact thorax. Moderate amounts of dubbing on the thread and instead three layers of it.



Step 17:


Take a few wraps with the hackle, tie it down and cut the waste. This is a point where you can see if the dubbing operation was successful. If it was, the thorax should have kept its shape and the wrapped hackle shouldn't have turned it into a shapeless mess.



Step 18:


Cut the top hackle barbs as close to the stem as possible.



Step 19:


Take the antron pieces and slide them between the fingers a couple of times to stretch out any loose filaments. Then fold them over the thorax.



Step 20:


Lay the thread over the antron while stretched forward and tighten slowly while you move the antron back and forth to get it as spread out and even as possible. Secure them with a couple of firm wraps close to the thorax, but don't cut the waste end yet.



Step 21:


The filaments are hard and slippery and we want to do more to secure them better. Stretch the yarn upwards and build a little thread bump immediately in front of it to hold it that way.



Step 22:


Cut the antron as close to the thread as possible and even the head out with a few wraps of thread.



Step 23:


Whip-finish and remove the thread. Apply some cement to the head and let the drop include a little bit of the antron where it disappears under the thread.

DONE!!!

Do vary colors as you would with the original Montana. Abdomens in yellow, chartreuse, red etc... and bodies in olive and brown.

/Nick
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Chris
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Location: Surrey, UK

PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for putting this up Niclas, and for persevering with the posting!

Nice to have you on here

Cheers,

Chris
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Runarsson

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Location: Soderhamn, Sweden

PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris wrote:
Thanks for putting this up Niclas, and for persevering with the posting!

Chris


It's easier to handle obstacles on a Saturday night... as there's usually a supporting glass beside the keyboard. Wink

/Nick
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barbus
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nice jobby, and its unweighted Very Happy cant seem to get monties near me that havnt got lead or beads on them.They need to fall through the water slowly almost neutral in boyancy, short jerky motion and allow to sink, Wink can be a killer Very Happy
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Runarsson

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

barbus wrote:
nice jobby, and its unweighted Very Happy cant seem to get monties near me that havnt got lead or beads on them.They need to fall through the water slowly almost neutral in boyancy, short jerky motion and allow to sink, Wink can be a killer Very Happy


I do tie them in beadhead version too, but I usually go for the unweighted one by the water. I'm mainly a stillwater fisherman and stand for entire days under trees making rollcasts. I find it easier to lift an unweighted fly when doing long rollcasts and when it comes to fishing, I haven't seen much difference in result. The compact body helps to take it down enough, I guess... and since the rollcast doesn't dry it after being soaked, airbubbles aren't a problem either.

(But it DOES give an even more up-to-date appearance with beadheaded version in the fly-box. ;o) )

/Nick
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barbus
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2007 3:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Runarsson wrote:
barbus wrote:
nice jobby, and its unweighted Very Happy cant seem to get monties near me that havnt got lead or beads on them.They need to fall through the water slowly almost neutral in boyancy, short jerky motion and allow to sink, Wink can be a killer Very Happy


I do tie them in beadhead version too, but I usually go for the unweighted one by the water. I'm mainly a stillwater fisherman and stand for entire days under trees making rollcasts. I find it easier to lift an unweighted fly when doing long rollcasts and when it comes to fishing, I haven't seen much difference in result. The compact body helps to take it down enough, I guess... and since the rollcast doesn't dry it after being soaked, airbubbles aren't a problem either.

(But it DOES give an even more up-to-date appearance with beadheaded version in the fly-box. ;o) )

/Nick


Well im not an under the tree guy, but i do stillwaters ,ive found the unweighted monty to be an allrounder, small ones can be used like a dry casting to a rise has given me many a fish, also greasing the head end allows the tail to sink below the water which might look like a juicy, well anything really buzzer, mayfly emerger ect with a couple of pulls you got yourself a slow sinking nymph Very Happy which you can adjust its sink depth by greasing your line.So the monty has many uses its my favourite and the first fly i ever used Very Happy
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Chris
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

White, Black and Fluo Yellow is a favourite combination of mine for Montanas. I also like them with a bead in the thorax for some additional weight.
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fredaevans
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool! First time I've seen this with 'twisted Antron.' Gives the fly body a really good/unique look.
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