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Have you ever eaten Gurnard

 
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Black - Don
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 2:11 pm    Post subject: Have you ever eaten Gurnard Reply with quote

We were out in Glasgow last night and visited Rogano for the 1st time to be pleasantly surprised by the nice relaxed atmosphere in this veteran of the Glasgow establishment.

What really caught me off guard me was the fact that they had Gurnard as the fish of the day which I ordered with some reluctance as I always thought it to be a poor fish. How wrong could I be when I found it to be one of the nicest tasting fish I have ever eaten !

In the past if I had ever gotten onto the Gurnard they would have gone straight back but not so now.

If you were targeting Gurnard where would you look for them and what bait would you use ?
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springwell
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gurnard prefer deep water and a sandy bottom.

They'll take fish strips or sandeels rather than worm baits and prefer a moving bait.

I've had quite a few over the years off boats but only occasionally off the shore off deep water rock marks in west Wales.

I've never bothered eating them, too many bones?

Bill
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've watched gurnard on many occasions hunting over sand while snorkelling in Menorca. Bill is spot on. They seem to react to movement and then use their pectoral fins like an umbrella to disorientate and cover the prey before striking. I nearly managed to hook one sight fishing on a white blob with a slow retrieve but made a mess of the hook up!


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes & its delicious!
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a table fish they are highly regarded by Italians for whatever to a slightly lesser extent but are right up there with
the prime eatng species if prepared & cooked properly .... just a pity they don't fight as well as many other species.

Too many bones ?????? providing they are a reasonable size reckon they have no more than most species & it is fairly
easy to obtain boneless filets plus as they have no scales have the option of leaving the lovely orange skin on which adds
to the taste & presentation just have to remember to shallow slice the outer skin in two or three places to prevent the
filets from curling.

As for habitat etc. not sure if the same applies up there but down here they are generally considered to be mostly a winter
or a colder weather fish as far as shallower water goes with the larger fish having finished spawning move into deeper water
as the temps warm up. Having said that they appear to tolerate a wider range of temperatures & various depths of water than
many species. As for food they are not fussy eaters but a bit restricted in choice by the fact they are relatively slow movers
so have to rely on digging crabs/shellfish etc fro the sand using their "legs" or otherwise rely on stealth by semi digging themselves
into the sand with only eyes protruding ready to pounce on any hapless unsuspecting victim.

As for bait they are not fussy & will eat almost anything on offer but often tend to "play" with it for awhile before taking it into
their mouth so pays not to strike too quickly at the first indication of a bite. As they are primarily bottom feeders a two dropper
ledger rig is ideal with a sinker on the bottom, first dropper ( 75 mm ) say 150 mm above then the next about 400 above that
& is important to use recurve hooks with the nylon trace passed thru the front of the hook which imparts a self hooking action.

Can put up pics of suitable rigs or methods of cooking if anyone interested.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bazza wrote:
Too many bones ?????? providing they are a reasonable size reckon they have no more than most species & it is fairly
easy to obtain boneless filets plus as they have no scales have the option of leaving the lovely orange skin on which adds
to the taste & presentation just have to remember to shallow slice the outer skin in two or three places to prevent the
filets from curling.

................

Can put up pics of suitable rigs or methods of cooking if anyone interested.


The fillets I had only had a couple of bones in them so I wouldn't have considered them to have been that bad.

If you have time to post the cooking methods and the pics, I'd be interested Bazza Smile
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah the Rogano, brings back memories that does, used to eat their often back in my wealthy Hospitality Management student days, when we got full grant, housing benefit, no tuition fees, cheap student accommodation, more pussy than I could cope with, only 16 hours a week studies and 20 hours per week tax free earnings plus obscene tips at the Hospitality Inn banqueting suites working as a wine waiter, oh those were the days.

As for Gurnard, well, prefer Whiting myself.

The Pirate.
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PitsfordPirate wrote:
Ah the Rogano, brings back memories that does, used to eat their often back in my wealthy Hospitality Management student days, when we got full grant, housing benefit, no tuition fees, cheap student accommodation, more pussy than I could cope with, only 16 hours a week studies and 20 hours per week tax free earnings plus obscene tips at the Hospitality Inn banqueting suites working as a wine waiter, oh those were the days.

As for Gurnard, well, prefer Whiting myself.

The Pirate.


Thankfully us tax payers have now been freed from such burdens.
Laughing Laughing
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finally got arround to cooking some gurnard again ... not suggesting this is the only or best method
to cook or prepare, simply that it was the method used on this occassion & were happy with the results.

Fillet the fish as per normal however unless it is a sizeable fish the fillets are going to be comparatively
longish & narrow therefore slicing lengthway to remove the pin bones as per the norm will make them
even narrower. To maintain the fillets closer to the original size leave the skin on & cut either side of the
pin bones without cutting thru the skin ( small blade location in pic ) then remove the narrow section of flesh
holding the bones. Alternatively the bones can be pulled out one at a time using long nosed pliers but that is
both fiddly & time consuming.

Once bones are removed turn fillets over & lightly diagonally partly slice thru the skin at say 60 to 75 mm
intervals to help prevent the fillets from curling when cooking.



Pre prepare a beer batter with chopped herbs ( parsley, chives, corriander etc.) also fine chopped then crushed
garlic & fresh ginger added then left to stand after beating for about 30 mins whisking again briefly just before
using.



Lightly dust fillets with flour then coat with batter before placing in a moderately hot pan of olive or even better
rice bran oil enough to cook the fish on both sides. Whilst fish is cooking, if you wish pepper can be ground over
the as yet uncooked batter on the topside. Turn fillets once the batter is judged to be golden brown to cook the
remaining side taking care not to overcook .... can in fact probably turn off the heat shortly after turning & leave
the fish to continue cooking with residual heat. Remove fillets onto paper towels to remove any excess oil then
place onto pre heated plates.





Garnish with lemon slices, serve with oven dry baked fries & a crisp cold salad along with a dry white wine of your choice.



Enjoy!
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks great Baz, must try that sometime Smile

I wish I was able to catch fish that would need a filleting knife that long on a regular basis Cool


PitsfordPirate wrote:
Ah the Rogano, brings back memories that does, used to eat their often back in my wealthy Hospitality Management student days, when we got full grant, housing benefit, no tuition fees, cheap student accommodation, more pussy than I could cope with, only 16 hours a week studies and 20 hours per week tax free earnings plus obscene tips at the Hospitality Inn banqueting suites working as a wine waiter, oh those were the days.

As for Gurnard, well, prefer Whiting myself.

The Pirate.


I can quite believe it Stuart Laughing

Never tried Whiting but am sure Robbo Green was saying that King George Whiting go for about $50 a kilo on his show the other night Shock
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Black-Don wrote:
Looks great Baz, must try that sometime Smile

I wish I was able to catch fish that would need a filleting knife that long on a regular basis Cool


Shock


The white handled knife is along bladed ham knife BD as is ideal for slicing the skin allowing it
to be done with a single draw giving better control over depth of cut .... have a range of filleting
knives but 90% of the time prefer a shorter blade for removing the fillets mainly because it affords
better control eliminating the stomach bones withot cutting the gut cavity then an often less than
sharp wide blade kittchen knife for skinning as find a sharpr knife prone to cutting thru the skin
or not always hugging close to the skin to give max amount of flesh.

Prefer not to skin scaleless fish such as gurnard & sometimes scale fish keeping skin on as doing so
definitely improves the flavour altho scaling can be a bit messy & laborious with scales flying each &
every way then once dry seem to magically find their way all thru the house perhaps wind driven or
carried in on feet thereby earning the ire of her indoors ... something to be truely feared.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bazza wrote:


Prefer not to skin scaleless fish such as gurnard & sometimes scale fish keeping skin on as doing so
definitely improves the flavour altho scaling can be a bit messy & laborious with scales flying each &
every way then once dry seem to magically find their way all thru the house perhaps wind driven or
carried in on feet thereby earning the ire of her indoors ... something to be truely feared.


So true but have you ever tried eating grilled sardines without scaling them, defo not recommended Laughing
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