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Life Saving INFO

 
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lakefisher
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2019 10:58 am    Post subject: Life Saving INFO Reply with quote

Well worth a watch - could possibly save your life.

https://www.respectthewater.com

HTH ....... Tony Cool
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wylye
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2019 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Useful advice, but when fishing from a boat or when wading above hip depth a life jacket should be the last item of "clothing" you put on.
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Fryfishing
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes always wear your P.F.D
Being new to Kayak fishing and already having taken a dip when I tipped it over, I can confirm that it is very disorienting when you fall in unexpectedly in any water.
Sad
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BristolFlyer
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fell out of my kayak on Monday about a mile off Exmouth. My line got wrapped around the rudder and I fell out trying to free it.

The conditions were totally benign with minimal current and I was wearing a life jacket but I learnt two things

> The VHF radio is useless if it is in the kayak and you are not! It will be attached to me from now on. Very Happy
> It is much easier to cut the line than try and free it from the rudder!

And I didn’t catch anything Crying or Very sad
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Fryfishing
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yikes, a mile off shore and you are in the drink.
Did you have to turn the kayak back over as well as re-enter it?
With my limited experience I have found it is better not to overreach trying to get or free things as that is when you over balance and tip it over.
I heard a story that at this years Pitsford kayak event some one tipped over in the tunnel trying to prevent their rods scrapping on the tunnels ceiling.
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BristolFlyer
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Luckily kayak didn’t tip over – though everything lashed down so not a problem hopefully. I could climb on quite easily but I probably should have tested that in the shallows first. With the speed that the wind moves a kayak I’m sure a lot of fatalities are caused when people fall off and then the kayak gets blown away with their phone and safety gear and they are left bobbing to succumb to hypothermia! I will be a lot more careful going forward! Very Happy
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RogB
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Along with the VHF attached to you and not the kayak don't forget to have a safety knife (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beaver-Sports-Trigger-Cutter-Orange/dp/B07BH42329/ are good) with you on your PFD to cut you out of tangled lines and a paddle leash so if you go in while paddling you just need to hold on to the paddle to keep in touch with the kayak.
Its recommended that you practice re-entry to an upturned kayak fairly regularly, not that I do, and also if you change things significantly such as a new PFD, changed seat etc just in case it fouls your favourite route.
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wylye
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can personally vouch for two things regarding potential life-threatening experiences in water.

1) Panic kills. A year or so after I joined the water industry I was sent on a life saving and water safety course at Aberavon in south Wales. The instructor was a barking mad Commander RN retired and during a series of lectures that was the thing he kept repeating. The majority of drownings occur in less than 6' of water and less than 6' from the bank. Panic kills. My experience of this happened when, as was his thing, it was "10 widths of the pool just to warm up. In turns. Go!" All was Ok for me for the first 5 or 6 widths until I turned to come back for another one and a small wave splashed up into my face just as I breathed in. In an instant I couldn't breathe and was overwhelmed in blind panic. It took and enormous effort of will to calm myself, breathe and continue the swim.

2) Coldwater shock. Dropping into cold water creates the conditions for panic. On the river Traun in Austria I was certain that if I stepped off a ledge a foot above the water, that lovely crystal clear water was only a foot deep and I could wade the 30' feet or so to reach a gravel bar in the river from which I could cast to some lovely fishy water. That foot deep water turned out to be nearer 3' and icy cold as well. I was wearing chest waders at the time which was helpful. I simply let go of the rod, rolled onto my back and paddled myself across to the gravel bar and crawled out. I took my waders off while sitting, emptied about a couple of pints of water out of them - wearing a wading belt helps to prevent too much water getting in. I then waded out and retrieved my rod, returned to the bar and carried on fishing.
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Fryfishing
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a good example, go to 3min 30.

Link

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